Data Center

Functional Requirements

for the

Minnesota

Multiple Measurement System

2012

August 20, 2012

I. Minnesota Multiple Measurement System

The Minnesota Department of Education has developed a system to rate schools based on multiple measurements. The system combines existing measures for each school (like Proficiency) with additional measures computed by the system (like Achievement Gap Reduction). Using the measurements, it ranks similar types of schools from highest to lowest. It then assigns points based on the ranking - higher ranking schools receive more points than lower ranking schools. Based on the combination of points computed and points available, two ratings are assigned. Using these two ratings, Title I schools receive a Multiple Measurement Designation.

Currently, there are three Multiple Measurement Designations:

• Reward

• Focus

• Priority

In 2012, two new designations were added:

• Celebration Eligible

• Continuous Improvement

These designations are based on two ratings:

• Multiple Measurement Rating (MMR)

• Focus Rating (FR)

These two ratings are derived from five measurements (called domains):

• Proficiency Domain

• Growth Domain

• Achievement Gap Reduction Domain

• Graduation Domain

• Focused Proficiency Domain

Each school may earn up to 25 points per domain based on how their measurement ranks against similar schools.

The MMR uses four of the domains if available: Proficiency, Growth, Achievement Gap Reduction and Graduation. The FR uses two of the domains if available, Achievement Gap Reduction and Focused Proficiency.

The five domains are all based on the AYP computation and the Minnesota Growth computation. The Proficiency, Graduation and Focused Proficiency domains use the number of AYP cells (groups) reaching their respective AYP targets. The Growth and Achievement Gap Reduction domains use the AYP students included in the AYP Proficiency measure with their assigned Growth Z Score.

Schools are placed into four school types when computing the MMR or FR:

• H: High School (classifications 32, 33, 40 and 46)

• M: Middle School (classifications 20 and 31)

• E: Elementary School (classification 10)

• O: Other School (all other school classifications).

Unless otherwise specified, all interim computations and proportions are held as values with floating decimal points. For readability, numbers shown in the examples in this document may not display the full value.

Year references are made using the fiscal year. For example, the year 2010 means the 2009/2010 school year. The year 2011 means the 2010/2011 school year. The year 2012 means the 2011/2012 school year.

The following sections describe how the domains and ratings are computed and how the designations are assigned.

II. Proficiency Domain

Summarize AYP Proficiency Marks

Normally, the Proficiency Domain uses the existing Proficiency AYP Marks. These have been previously computed during the AYP computation and may have administrative overrides applied when appeals are granted. However, when computing the initial Multiple Measurement designations, new targets were established for each AYP subgroup using the statewide averages for 2011. The AYP proficiency calculation for 2011 was rerun using these new targets and the resulting Proficiency AYP Marks were used in the 2011 Proficiency Domain. In 2012, the new targets were incorporated into the general AYP process.

The Proficiency Domain does not consider safe harbor to be a passing mark so the summary procedure only looks an AYP Marks of A as passing, Marks B and S are not passing. Only schools are included in this measure; the district and state results are not used. Each school is given a weighted proportion of cells reaching the AYP target on proficiency for the cells large enough to be measured.

For example: Here is a sample of what the AYP proficiency summary marks might look like for a school showing the AYP cells:

Category

Subject

Proficiency Document Count

AYP

Mark

Include in Numerator

Include in Denominator

SQRT Document Count x Numerator

SQRT Document Count x Denominator

All

M

91

S

0

1

0

9.539392014

All

R

85

B

0

1

0

9.219544457

Am Indian

M

14

Z

0

0

0

0

Am Indian

R

15

Z

0

0

0

0

Black

M

1

Z

0

0

0

0

Black

R

1

Z

0

0

0

0

White

M

76

A

1

1

8.7177978

8.717797887

White

R

69

A

1

1

8.3066238

8.306623862

Special

M

23

S

0

1

0

4.795831523

Special

R

19

Z

0

0

0

0

FRP

M

50

A

1

1

7.0710678

7.071067811

FRP

R

50

A

1

1

7.0710678

7.071067811

Total

         

31.166557

54.72132536

The AYP cells are evaluated. The marks of A are included in the numerator, the marks of A, B and S are included in the denominator. The weighted proportion of cells reaching their AYP targets (WPC_ReachingTarget) is computed. The weighted proportion uses the square root of the proficiency document count – not the cell count as percent of the total – when determining the weighting. The computed figures are added together and the numerator is divided by the denominator to arrive at the WPC_ReachingTarget. That result is rounded to 8 decimal points.

WPC_ReachingTarget =

SUM(SQRT(DocumentCount)*Numerator) / SUM(SQRT(DocumentCount)*Denominator)

In the example above, the total for the numerator is divided by the total for the denominator and then rounded to 8 decimal points. 31.1667 / 54.7213 = 0.56955456433 = 0.56955456.

Rank Schools to assign the Proficiency Domain Points

Once the WPC_ReachingTarget is computed for each school, the schools are ranked according to their school type. To receive a ranking, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement.

Rank the schools using the WPC_ReachingTarget – from highest to lowest – by school type. If there are 891 elementary schools, they are ranked in order from 1 (highest WPC_ReachingTarget) through 891 (lowest WPC_ReachingTarget).

When ties are encountered (when the schools in question each have the same WPC_ReachingTarget), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question.

For example, the table below shows 8 schools with ties for rank 1 and rank 5:

WPC_ReachingTarget

Original ranking

Final ranking after ties resolved.

Percentile

Proficiency Domain Points

1.00

1

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

1.00

2

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

1.00

3

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

.9876

4

4

0.996071829405163

24.90180

.9874

5

5

0.994949494949495

24.87374

.9874

6

5

0.994949494949495

24.87374

.9872

7

7

0.992704826038159

24.81762

.9870

8

8

0.991582491582492

24.78956

Assign Percentile

Once the final ranking has been established, assign the percentile based on the number of schools with the same school type. If there are 891 elementary schools, the percentile is computed by taking the group size and subtracting the final ranking of the school plus 0.5. That figure is then divided by the group size. To receive a percentile, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement.

Percentile = (groupsize-rankNumber+0.5)/groupsize

In our example above, school with a final ranking of 1 are assigned the percentile of
(891 – 1) + 0.5 = 890.5 divided by 891 = 0.999438832772166

Assign Proficiency Domain Points

The final step is to assign the Proficiency Domain Points. Each domain is allocated 25 points. It is computed by taking the percentile and multiplying it by 25. To receive Proficiency Domain Points, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement.

Domain_Points = percentile*25.0

III. Growth Domain

Growth Z Scores are assigned to most students used in the AYP Proficiency calculation. The Growth Z Score is computed by taking the actual score and subtracting the expected score and then dividing by the standard deviation. The result is rounded to 4 decimal points.

growthZScore = (ActualScore- ExpectedScore)/StandardDeviation

Since there may be large fluctuations in scores between years for a student, the Growth Z Score is capped. All Growth Z Scores fall between +3.0000 and -3.0000.

Some students are not used in the MMR Growth measurement. Students without a prior score or for whom there is no matching test in the prior applicable year are not included in the MMR Growth measurement. Also, students without a normal grade progression are excluded from the MMR Growth Measurement. Students taking the MTAS in both applicable years are included in the MMR Growth Measurement.

Further details on how the Growth Z Score was assigned as well as the MMR inclusion criteria can be found in the functional documentation for the Minnesota Growth calculation. https://education.state.mn.us/MDEAnalytics/Data.jsp Select Assessment and Growth Files, in the first dropdown select Growth, then list files, then select one of the help files.

Summarize Growth Z Scores

The Growth Domain process then averages each school’s Growth Z Score regardless of subject. Only those students who are included in the school’s AYP Proficiency calculation are included in the averages and only those records designated as ‘Include in the MMR’ are used. For example, the following table illustrates eight students with their corresponding growth information and whether it should be used (Include in MMR = ‘Y’):

ID

Grade

Test

Subject

Score

Prior Grade

Prior Test

Prior Score

Growth Z Score

Include in MMR

298856

03

MCA-II

R

370.0

       

N

298856

03

MCA-III

M

362.0

       

N

298910

05

MCA-II

R

541.0

04

MCA-II

444

-0.7075

Y

298910

05

MCA-III

M

544.0

04

MTELL

447

0.4175

Y

298916

04

MCA-III

M

459.0

04

MCA-II

444

 

N

298916

04

MCA-II

R

465.0

04

MCA-II

436

 

N

298919

05

MCA-III

M

554.0

04

MCA-II

451

1.3132

Y

298919

05

MCA-II

R

541.0

04

MCA-II

436

0.1316

Y

299218

04

MCA-III

M

465.0

03

MCA-II

360

0.7625

Y

299218

04

MCA-II

R

478.0

03

MCA-II

367

2.1118

Y

299244

06

MCA-II

R

667.0

05

MTAS

200

 

N

299244

06

MCA-III

M

667.0

05

MTAS

201

 

N

299245

04

MCA-III

M

487.0

03

MCA-II

370

1.6832

Y

299245

04

MCA-II

R

467.0

03

MCA-II

390

-0.4686

Y

299293

05

MTAS

R

190.0

04

MTAS

200

-0.8154

Y

299293

05

MTAS-III

M

200.0

04

MTAS

201

0.2561

Y

The resulting Growth Z Score averages are used to rank each school and assign the percentile and Growth Domain Points. For example, the following table illustrates 5 schools with their Average Growth Z Score:

School

Include in

MMR Growth Count

Unique

Student Count

Average

Growth Z Score

150

371

186

0.065906

315

592

592

0.022053

316

3

3

-0.7481

325

1854

932

0.082692

306

85

60

-0.83582

Rank Schools to assign the Growth Domain Points

Once the Average Growth Z Score is computed for each school, the schools are ranked according to their school type. To receive a ranking, schools must have at least 20 unique students included in the average.

Rank the schools using the Average Growth Z Score – from highest to lowest – by school type. If there are 830 elementary schools eligible, they are ranked in order from 1 (highest Average Growth Z Score) through 830 (lowest Average Growth Z Score).

When ties are encountered (the schools in question each have the same Average Growth Z Score), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question. For example:

Average

Growth Z Score

Original ranking

Final ranking after ties resolved.

Percentile

Growth Domain Points

0.065906

549

549

0.33915662

8.4789156

0.065906

550

549

0.33915662

8.4789156

0.065906

551

549

0.33915662

8.4789156

0.064846

552

552

0.33554216

8.3885542

0.063561

553

553

0.33433734

8.3584333

0.061323

554

554

0.33313253

8.3283132

Assign Percentile

Once the final ranking has been established, assign the percentile based on the number of schools with the same school type. If there are 830 elementary schools, the percentile is computed by taking the group size and subtracting the final ranking of the schools +0.5. That figure is then divided by the group size. To receive a percentile, schools must have at least 20 unique students included in the average.

Percentile = (groupsize-rankNumber+0.5)/groupsize

In our example above, school with a final ranking of 549 are assigned the percentile of
(830 – 549) +0.5 = 281.5 divided by 830 = 0.339156626506024

Assign Growth Domain Points

The final step is to assign the Growth Domain Points. Each domain is allocated 25 points. It is computed by taking the percentile and multiplying it by 25. To receive Growth Domain Points, schools must have at least 20 unique students included in the average.

Domain_Points = percentile*25.0

IV. Achievement Gap Reduction Domain

Establish Statewide Targets

Similar to the summary for average Growth Z Scores, each school is assigned an Achievement Gap Reduction Score (AGR Score). This is the difference between a group’s average growth Z score compared to the statewide targets (the statewide average growth Z scores for the comparison groups).

The targets are the statewide average for the White group, the Non-LEP group, the Non-SPE group and the Non-FRP group. The targets are normally the statewide averages from the previous year. But for 2010 and 2011, the averages from the matching year were used. The averages are rounded to 8 decimal points.

Only those students who are included in the statewide AYP Proficiency calculation are included in the averages and only those records designated as ‘Include in the MMR’ are used.

The following table shows the Achievement gap reduction targets for 2010 and 2011:

Subject

Group

2010 Gap Reduction Target

(Statewide Average Growth Z Score)

2011 Gap Reduction Target

(Statewide Average Growth Z Score)

M

White

0.100917

0.084791

M

Not LEP

0.076298

0.056210

M

Not SPE

0.109655

0.081633

M

Not FRP

0.137938

0.131457

R

White

0.155419

0.160917

R

Not LEP

0.134419

0.145836

R

Not SPE

0.145441

0.175626

R

Not FRP

0.195370

0.207400

Use of Statewide Targets in Future Years

If the targets go down in a year, the previous year’s targets are used. If the targets go up in a year, the current year targets are used.

• When computing gaps for 2010, the statewide averages for 2010 are used.

• When computing gaps for 2011, the statewide averages for 2011 are used.

• When computing gaps for 2012, the statewide averages for 2011 will be used.

• When computing gaps for 2013, the higher average between the two most recent years will be used.

Summarize Growth Z Scores for students from Achievement Gap groups

The Achievement Gap Reduction Domain process averages the Growth Z Score for each group in a school by subject. Only those students who are included in the school’s AYP Proficiency calculation are included in the averages and only those records designated as ‘Include in the MMR’ are used.

Additionally, only students from the Achievement Gap groups are included. The ALL student category and the WHITE student category are not used in the school’s averages. For example, here are the results of a single school’s Achievement Gap populations showing the average Z score by subject:

Subject

Achievement Gap Category

Include in

MMR Growth Count

Average Growth Z Score

Statewide Average Growth Z Score for Comparison Group

Achievement Gap Reduction Score

M

Asian

35

-0.116174

0.084791

0.200965

M

Hispanic

9

-0.118922

0.084791

0.203713

M

Black

36

-0.458611

0.084791

0.543402

M

LEP

25

-0.401172

0.056210

0.457382

M

Special

34

-0.345476

0.081633

0.427109

M

FRP

79

-0.243622

0.131457

0.375079

R

Indian

1

-1.2604

0.160917

1.421317

R

Asian

40

0.064622

0.160917

0.096295

R

Hispanic

10

-0.20233

0.160917

0.363247

R

Black

30

-0.061583

0.160917

0.2225

R

LEP

30

-0.11188

0.145836

0.257716

R

Special

30

-0.258063

0.175626

0.433689

R

FRP

80

-0.085885

0.207400

0.293285

The average growth Z score for each group is compared to the statewide target and the difference is the Achievement Gap Reduction Score (AGR Score).

AGR_Score = StatewideGrowthZScoreAverage GrowthZScoreAverage

The comparisons use the following:

• Indian average compared to statewide White average

• Asian average compared to statewide White average

• Hispanic average compared to statewide White average

• Black average compared to statewide White average

• LEP average compared to statewide non-LEP average

• Special Education average compared to statewide non-Special Education average

• FRP average compared to statewide non-FRP average

In these cases, the smaller the number, the smaller the achievement gap.

The AGR scores for the groups are merged together using the weighted average by subject, and then again for the two subjects to arrive at a single AGR score for the school. That result is rounded to 8 decimal points.

SUM(SQRT(NCount) * AGR_Score) )/( SUM(SQRT(NCount))) AS AGR_Score

Using our previous example, each subject has its own weighted average for the Growth Z Score and the AGR Score. Then the school has a single weighted average for the Growth Z Score and the AGR score. The following table illustrates these weighted averages.

Subject

Achievement Gap Category

Include in

MMR Growth Count

Average Growth Z Score

Achievement Gap Reduction Score

M

Asian

35

-0.116174

0.200965

M

Hispanic

9

-0.118922

0.203713

M

Black

36

-0.458611

0.543402

M

LEP

25

-0.401172

0.457382

M

Special

34

-0.345476

0.427109

M

FRP

79

-0.243622

0.375079

Math

Weighted Average

218

-0.2881863756

0.380295282152

R

Indian

1

-1.2604

1.421317

R

Asian

40

0.064622

0.096295

R

Hispanic

10

-0.20233

0.363247

R

Black

30

-0.061583

0.2225

R

LEP

30

-0.11188

0.257716

R

Special

30

-0.258063

0.433689

R

FRP

80

-0.085885

0.293285

Reading

Weighted Average

221

-0.1289153281

0.301368495894

School

Overall Weighted Average

439

-0.2082787457

0.340697046698

Rank Schools to assign the Achievement Gap Reduction Domain Points

Once the overall AGR Score is computed for each school, the schools are ranked according to their school type. To receive a ranking, schools must have at least 20 unique students included in the average.

Rank the schools using the AGR Score – from highest to lowest – by school type. If there are 424 high schools, they are ranked in order from 1 (highest AGR Score) through 424 (lowest AGR Score).

When ties are encountered (the schools in question each have the same AGR Score), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question. For example:

AGR Score

Original ranking

Final ranking after ties resolved.

Percentile

Achievement Gap Reduction Domain Points

0.34069705

282

282

0.336084905660377

8.40212264150943

0.34139387

283

283

0.33372641509434

8.34316037735849

0.34139387

284

283

0.33372641509434

8.34316037735849

0.34293124

285

285

0.329009433962264

8.2252358490566

0.34459632

286

286

0.326650943396226

8.16627358490566

0.34471607

287

287

0.324292452830189

8.10731132075472

Assign Percentile

Once the final ranking has been established, assign the percentile based on the number of schools with the same school type. If there are 424 high schools, the percentile is computed by taking the group size and subtracting the final ranking of the schools +0.5. That figure is then divided by the group size. To receive a percentile, schools must have at least 20 unique students included in the average.

Percentile = (groupsize-rankNumber+0.5)/groupsize

In our example above, the school with a final ranking of 282 is assigned the percentile of
(424 – 282) +0.5 = 142.5 divided by 424 = 0. 336084905660377

Assign Achievement Gap Reduction Domain Points

The final step is to assign the Achievement Gap Reduction Domain Points. Each domain is allocated 25 points. It is computed by taking the percentile and multiplying it by 25. To receive Achievement Gap Reduction Domain Points, schools must have at least 20 students unique students included in the average.

Domain_Points = percentile*25.0

V. Graduation Domain

Summarize AYP Marks for Graduation

The Graduation Domain uses the existing Graduation AYP Marks. These have been previously computed during the AYP computation and may have administrative overrides applied when appeals are granted.

The Graduation Domain considers any AYP Mark of A to be a passing mark. Beginning in 2012, this includes those schools showing marked improvement over the prior 4-year, 5-year or 6-year rates as long as the respective targets of 3%, 4%, or 5% improvement were met. The summary procedure considers Marks of B as not passing. Each school is given a weighted proportion of cells reaching the AYP goal on graduation for the cells large enough to be measured.

Only schools are included in this measure; the district and state results are not used. Furthermore, only schools classified as high schools are eligible to receive a graduation rate.

For example: Here is a sample of what the AYP graduation marks might look like for a school showing the categories (AYP cells):

Category

Graduation Cohort Count

AYP

Mark

Include in Numerator

Include in Denominator

SQRT x Numerator

SQRT x Denominator

All

1224

A

1

1

34.985711

34.985711

Am Indian

5

Z

0

0

0

0

Asian

100

A

1

1

10.000000

10.000000

Hispanic

48

B

0

1

0

6.9282032

Black

109

B

0

1

0

10.440306

White

962

A

1

1

31.016124

31.016124

LEP

64

B

0

1

0

8.0000000

Special

94

A

1

1

9.6953597

9.6953597

FRP

233

A

1

1

15.264337

15.264337

Total

       

100.96153

126.33004

The cells are evaluated and the weighted proportion of cells reaching their respective AYP targets (WPC_ReachingTarget) is computed. The weighted proportion uses the square root of the Graduation Cohort Count – not the cell count as a percent of the total – when determining the weighting. The computed figures are added together and the numerator is divided by the denominator to arrive at the WPC_ReachingTarget. That result is rounded to 8 decimal points.

WPC_ReachingTarget =

SUM(SQRT(CohortCount)*Numerator) / SUM(SQRT(CohortCount)*Denominator)

In the example above, the total for the numerator is divided by the total for the denominator. 100.9615 / 126.3300 = 0.799188624 = 0.79918862

Rank Schools to assign the Graduation Domain Points

Once the WPC_ReachingTarget is computed for each school, the schools are ranked according to their school type. To receive a ranking, schools must have at least 40 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Graduation measurement.

Rank the schools using the WPC_ReachingTarget – from highest to lowest – by school type. If there are 294 high schools eligible, they are ranked in order from 1 (highest WPC_ReachingTarget) through 294 (lowest WPC_ReachingTarget).

When ties are encountered (the schools in question each have the same WPC_ReachingTarget), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question. For example:

WPC_ReachingTarget

Original ranking

Final ranking after ties resolved.

Percentile

Graduation Domain Points

1.00

1

1

0.998299319727891

24.95748

1.00

2

1

0.998299319727891

24.95748

1.00

3

1

0.998299319727891

24.95748

.9876

4

4

0.988095238095238

24.70238

.9874

5

5

0.98469387755102

24.61735

.9874

6

5

0.98469387755102

24.61735

.9872

7

7

0.977891156462585

24.44728

.9870

8

8

0.974489795918367

24.36224

Assign Percentile

Once the final ranking has been established, assign the percentile based on the number of schools with the same school type. If there are 294 high schools, the percentile is computed by taking the group size and subtracting the final ranking of the schools + 0.5. That figure is then divided by the group size. To receive a percentile, schools must have at least 40 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Graduation measurement.

Percentile = (groupsize-rankNumber+0.5)/groupsize

In our example above, school with a final ranking of 1 are assigned the percentile of
(294 – 1) +0.5 = 293.5 divided by 294 = 0.998299319727891

Assign Graduation Domain Points

The final step is to assign the Graduation Domain Points. Each domain is allocated 25 points. It is computed by taking the percentile and multiplying it by 25. To receive Graduation Domain points, schools must have at least 40 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Graduation measurement.

Domain_Points = percentile*25.0

VI. Focused Proficiency Domain

Summarize AYP Proficiency Marks for Achievement Gap groups

The Focused Proficiency Domain is similar to the Proficiency Domain and uses the existing Proficiency AYP Marks. These have been previously computed during the AYP computation and may have administrative overrides applied when appeals are granted. However, when computing the initial Multiple Measurement designations, new targets were established for each AYP subgroup using the statewide averages for 2011. The AYP proficiency calculation for 2011 was rerun using these new targets and the resulting Proficiency AYP Marks were used in the Focused Proficiency Domain. In 2012, the new targets were incorporated into the general AYP process.

The Focused Proficiency Domain excludes the ALL category and the WHITE category. Otherwise the process is the same as the Proficiency Domain.

The Focused Proficiency Domain does not consider safe harbor to be a passing mark so the summary procedure only considers AYP Marks of A as passing, Marks B and S are not passing. Only schools are included in this measure, the district and state results are not used. Each school is given a weighted proportion of cells reaching the AYP target on proficiency for the cells large enough to be measured.

For example: Here is a sample of what the AYP proficiency summary marks might look like for a school showing the AYP cells used for the Focused Proficiency Domain. The ALL and WHITE categories are excluded when looking at the Focused Proficiency Domain:

Category

Subject

Proficiency Document Count

AYP

Mark

Include in Numerator

Include in Denominator

SQRT x Numerator

SQRT x Denominator

All

M

excluded

         

All

R

excluded

         

Am Indian

M

14

Z

0

0

0

0

Am Indian

R

15

Z

0

0

0

0

Black

M

1

Z

0

0

0

0

Black

R

1

Z

0

0

0

0

White

M

excluded

         

White

R

excluded

         

Special

M

23

S

0

1

0

4.795831523

Special

R

19

Z

0

0

0

0

FRP

M

50

A

1

1

7.0710678

7.071067811

FRP

R

50

A

1

1

7.0710678

7.071067811

Total

         

14.142135

18.93796715

The AYP cells are evaluated. The marks of A are included in the numerator, the marks of A, B and S are included in the denominator. The weighted proportion of cells reaching their respective AYP targets (WPC_ReachingTarget) is computed. The weighted proportion uses the square root of the proficiency document count – not the cell count as percent of the total – when determining the weighting. The computed figures are added together and the numerator is divided by the denominator to arrive at the WPC_ReachingTarget. That result is rounded to 8 decimal points.

WPC_ReachingTarget =

SUM(SQRT(DocumentCount)*Numerator) / SUM(SQRT(DocumentCount)*Denominator)

In the example above, the total for the numerator is divided by the total for the denominator. 14.142135 / 18.93796715= 0.746761017 = 0.74676102.

Rank Schools to assign the Focused Proficiency Points

Once the WPC_ReachingTarget is computed for each school, the schools are ranked according to their school type. To receive a ranking, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement (other than the ALL and WHITE categories).

Rank the schools using the WPC_ReachingTarget – from highest to lowest – by school type. If there are 891 elementary schools, they are ranked in order from 1 (highest WPC_ReachingTarget) through 891 (lowest WPC_ReachingTarget).

When ties are encountered (when the schools in question each have the same WPC_ReachingTarget), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question.

For example, the table below shows 8 schools with ties for rank 1 and rank 5:

WPC_ReachingTarget

Original ranking

Final ranking after ties resolved.

Percentile

Focused Proficiency Domain Points

1.00

1

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

1.00

2

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

1.00

3

1

0.999438832772166

24.98597

.9876

4

4

0.996071829405163

24.90180

.9874

5

5

0.994949494949495

24.87374

.9874

6

5

0.994949494949495

24.87374

.9872

7

7

0.992704826038159

24.81762

.9870

8

8

0.991582491582492

24.78956

Assign Percentile

Once the final ranking has been established, assign the percentile based on the number of schools with the same school type. If there are 891 elementary schools, the percentile is computed by taking the group size and subtracting the final ranking of the school plus 0.5. That figure is then divided by the group size. To receive a percentile, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement (other than the ALL and WHITE categories).

Percentile = (groupsize-rankNumber+0.5)/groupsize

In our example above, school with a final ranking of 1 are assigned the percentile of
(891 – 1) + 0.5 = 890.5 divided by 891 = 0.999438832772166

Assign Focus Proficiency Domain Points

The final step is to assign the Focused Proficiency Domain Points. Each domain is allocated 25 points. It is computed by taking the percentile and multiplying it by 25. To receive Focused Proficiency Domain points, schools must have at least 20 students in any one of the cells measured for the AYP Proficiency measurement (other than the ALL and WHITE categories).

Domain_Points = percentile*25.0

VII. Generate the Annual MMR and FR for each school

The four MMR Domains (Proficiency, Growth, Achievement Gap Reduction and Graduation) are grouped together to provide an overall Multiple Measurement Rating (MMR) for each school. For an individual year, the points are added together and divided by the total points possible to arrive at a proportion. The resulting proportion is rounded to 4 decimal points and converted to a percent.

For Example:

AYP

Year

Domain

MMR Points

Earned

MMR Points Possible

MMR

Proportion

MMR

2012

Proficiency

24.9710648148148

25

   

2012

Growth

9.8546511627907

25

   

2012

Gap Reduction

10.5247641509434

25

   

2012

Graduation

24.9574829931973

25

   

2012

TOTAL

70.3079631217462

100

0.7031

70.31%

The two FR Domains (Focus and Achievement Gap Reduction) are grouped together to provide an overall Focus Rating (FR) for each school For an individual year, the points are added together and divided by the total points possible to arrive at a proportion. The resulting proportion is rounded to 4 decimal points and converted to a percent.

For Example:

AYP

Year

Domain

FR Points

Earned

FR Points Possible

FR Proportion

FR

2012

Focused Proficiency

24.967277486911

25

   

2012

Gap Reduction

10.5247641509434

25

   

2012

TOTAL

35.4920416378544

50

0.7098

70.98%

In both cases, the school must have more than one measurement available in the year. Those schools without a measure or with only one measure in the year are not eligible to receive an annual rating.

In 2012, the annual MMR and FR (from a single year of data) will be used to assign the annual Multiple Measurement Designations. The initial Multiple Measurement Designation used two years of data (2010 and 2011 combined).

VIII. Annual Multiple Measurement Designations

The initial designations of Priority and Focus remain with a school for multiple years. The other designations are done annually in the following order:

• Continuous Improvement

• Reward

• Celebration Eligible

To receive an annual Multiple Measurement Designation:

• The school must exist in in the measured year (2012).

• The school must have two or more measurements (domains) available in the year evaluated (2012).

• The school must be designated as Title I in the measured year (2012).

The annual Multiple Measurement Designations are based on the total number of public schools who have applied for Title I funding in the measured year (2012).

Schools classified as care, treatment or correctional facilities are not eligible to receive an annual Multiple Measurement Designation. These are schools with classifications of:

• 70 – Correctional School

• 71 – Miscellaneous Program or Center

• 72 – Neglected/Delinquent School

• 73 – Homeless School/Program

• 74 – Hospital/Medical Program

• 76 – Provides Oversight – Private Residential Care/Treatment

• 77 – Provides Oversight – Public Residential Care/Treatment

• 78 – Provides Oversight – Private Day Treatment

• 79 – Provides Oversight – Public Day Treatment

Priority Designation

Those schools previously designated as Priority retain the Priority designation in 2012.

Focus Designation

Those schools previously designated as Focus retain the Focus designation in 2012.

Continuous Improvement Designation

The Continuous Improvement designation evaluates the annual MMR from the 2012 measurements. The Title I schools are ranked – from highest to lowest – using the annual MMR according to their school type. When ties are encountered (when the schools in question each have the same annual MMR), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question.

A. Percentage allocated

A minimum of twenty-five percent of the Title I schools in 2012 are needed to allocate to the Continuous Improvement designation. The twenty-five percent includes the schools previously designated as Priority or Focus – but these schools retain their earlier designations. When computing the twenty-five percent, a fractional result is rounded up the next highest integer.

Twenty-FivePercent = CEILING(Title1SchoolCount * .25)

For example: 849 * .25 = 212.25 = 213 schools

The ranking assists in determining which schools receive the Multiple Measurement Designation of Continuous Improvement. Since there are four school types (High School, Middle School, Elementary School, and Other School), they are proportionally represented in the twenty-five percent allocation.

B. Priority and Focus Schools

In 2011, 42 schools were designated as Priority and 85 were designated as Focus. In 2012, these schools retained their designations and are counted in the twenty-five percent allocation but will retain their initial designations of Priority and Focus.

D. Determining number of schools by school type

The four school types are represented in the twenty-five percent allocation by their proportion represented in the ranking. The Title I schools (including the Priority and Focus schools) are totaled by school type and each proportion is computed. That proportion is used to determine the group’s contribution to the twenty-five percent allocation. For example: If 213 schools are needed, 127 of which are the Priority and Focus schools, 86 additional schools are needed to complete the allocation. The following table illustrates this computation:

School Type

Title I schools in Continuous Improvement ranking

Proportion in Ranking

Additional Schools Needed

School Type Contribution

Elementary

630

0.838881491344874

86

72

High

74

0.0985352862849534

86

8

Middle

43

0.0572569906790945

86

5

Other

4

0.00532623169107856

86

1

Total

751

1

86

86

Each school type must contribute at least one previously undesignated school to the twenty-five percent allocation. In some instances, more schools will be included in the Multiple Measurement Designation of Continuous Improvement to meet the minimum twenty-five percent allocation.

E. Determining the Continuous Improvement schools

The ranking is used to designate the required contribution by school type. The 86 schools are derived from the lowest ranked schools that have not already been designated as Priority or Focus. In our example above, 72 lowest ranked elementary schools, 8 lowest ranked high schools, 5 lowest ranked middle schools and 1 lowest ranked other school are selected.

Reward Designation

The Reward designation process evaluates the annual MMR from the 2012 measurements. The Title I schools are ranked – from highest to lowest – using the annual MMR according to their school type. When ties are encountered (when the schools in question each have the same annual MMR), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question.

A. Percentage allocated

A minimum of fifteen percent of the Title I schools in 2012 are allocated to the Reward designation. When computing the fifteen percent, a fractional result is rounded up the next highest integer.

FifteenPercent = CEILING(Title1SchoolCount * .15)

For example: 849 * .15 = 127.35 = 128 schools

The ranking assists in determining which schools receive the Multiple Measurement Designation of Reward. Since there are four school types (High School, Middle School, Elementary School, and Other School), they are proportionally represented in the fifteen percent allocation.

B. Determining number of schools by school type

The four school types are represented in the fifteen percent allocation by their proportion represented in the ranking. The Title I schools are totaled by school type and each proportion is computed. The following table illustrates this computation:

School Type

Title I schools in Reward ranking

Proportion in Ranking

Schools Needed

School Type Contribution

E

630

0.838881491344874

128

107

H

74

0.0985352862849534

128

13

M

43

0.0572569906790945

128

7

O

4

0.00532623169107856

128

1

Total

751

1

128

128

Each school type must contribute at least one previously undesignated school to the fifteen percent allocation. In some instances, more schools will be included in the Multiple Measurement Designation to meet the minimum fifteen percent allocation.

C. Determining the Reward schools

The ranking is used to designate the required contribution by school type. The Reward schools are derived from the highest ranked schools that are not already designated as Priority or Focus. In our example above, 107 highest ranked elementary schools, 13 highest ranked high schools, 7 highest ranked middle schools and 1 highest ranked other school are selected.

Celebration Eligible Designation

The Celebration Eligible designation process evaluates the annual MMR from the 2012 measurements. The Title I schools are ranked – from highest to lowest – using the annual MMR according to their school type. When ties are encountered (when the schools in question each have the same annual MMR), set the ranking to the highest ranking of the schools in question.

A. Percentage allocated

A minimum of forty percent of the Title I schools in 2012 are needed to allocate to the Celebration Eligible designation. The forty percent includes the schools previously designated as Reward – but these schools retain their earlier designation. When computing the forty percent, a fractional result is rounded up the next highest integer.

FortyPercent = CEILING(Title1SchoolCount * .40)

For example: 849 * .40 = 339.6 = 340 schools

The ranking assists in determining which schools receive the Multiple Measurement Designation of Celebration Eligible. Since there are four school types (High School, Middle School, Elementary School, and Other School), they are proportionally represented in the forty percent allocation. The Reward designations are set just before the Celebration Eligible designations. The Reward designations take fifteen percent of the allocated forty percent. The remaining twenty-five percent are designated as Celebration Eligible.

B. Determining number of schools by school type

The four school types are represented in the forty percent allocation by their proportion represented in the ranking. The Title I schools are totaled by school type and each proportion is computed. The following table illustrates this computation:

School Type

Title I schools in Celebration Eligible ranking

Proportion in Ranking

Additional Schools Needed

School Type Contribution

E

630

0.838881491344874

212

178

H

74

0.0985352862849534

212

21

M

43

0.0572569906790945

212

12

O

4

0.00532623169107856

212

1

Total

751

1

212

212

Each school type must contribute at least one previously undesignated school to the forty percent allocation. In some instances, more schools will be included in the Multiple Measurement Designation to meet the minimum fifteen percent allocation.

C. Determining the Celebration Eligible schools

The ranking is used to designate the required contribution by school type. The Celebration Eligible schools are derived from the highest ranked schools that are not already designated as Priority or Focus or Continuous Improvement or Reward. In our example above, 179 highest ranked elementary schools, 21 highest ranked high schools, 12 highest ranked middle schools and 1 highest ranked other school are selected.